Dennis Huskins

0.4 lb. White Crappie caught by Dennis Huskins fishing in New Jersey on 05/08/11

Posted by Dennis Huskins Elite Member over 9 years ago

0.4 lb. White Crappie caught by Dennis Huskins fishing in New Jersey on 05/08/11
7.0" / 0.4 lb. White Crappie caught by Dennis Huskins fishing on Sunday May 08, 2011 at 19:15 near Trenton in Mercer County, New Jersey (NJ), United States North America using a Aglia # 4 Gold no tail a In-Line Spinner by Mepps

Back last evening to Miry and just wanted to be sure that all the crappie luck with Brian was not a fluke. Caught 3 more crappie 2 blacks and a white. Question for the experts, how can 2 fish so similar exist in the same lake? You would think over time, since they share the same niche, that one or the other would dominate and drive the other away.

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Bob Apjohn
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Comments

Henry V

Dennis,
On another note, here is the one thing that always blew my mind about Crappies: they move in a predictable pattern, like a triangle, as a school.

I wonder how scientists explain that motion....

Posted by Henry V Elite Member over 9 years ago

Dennis Huskins

Henry, Thanks for your sage review. I get caught up in natural evolution and two species that share the same niche usually over a long time have a winner and looser. That does take many thousands of years. A Dam lake in NJ or NC that's been there 35-50 years has not fallen to the Human - Neanderthal- A robustus strife with climate changes and scarcity putting real pressure on the ecosystem.

Posted by Dennis Huskins Elite Member over 9 years ago

Brian Shea

Still pulling them in I see

Posted by Brian Shea Elite Member over 9 years ago

Henry V

Good question. The same could be asked about LM/SM Bass that co-exist, or sunfish populations (Bluegill, Redear, Pumpkinseed), or Pikes, etc.

First , it depends on the size of the lake and the available food. If there is enough for both the white and black crappie, the different species thrive and co-exist. And since Crappie tend to be more active in the spring and fall, they don't compete for the summer food that other fishes eat.

Second, if there are predator species, then they keep the food chain balanced. Snapping turtles, catfishes, pikes, bass, all do their part, as do birds like egrets. If the predators eat the crappie then there are never so many crappie that they crowd everything else out of the lake.

Third, it takes a very long time for one species to naturally dominate a body of water, if at all. Usually it requires that either a disaster like a drought or a man made disaster like a toxin spill kill nearly everything. If one species remains, they may dominate when things recover.
But even then it can be fixed if it is a well-managed lake. That's why fishing licenses are important: they fund studies that determine the health of a lake. If something is wrong biologists might decide to introduce a few extra predator fishes with the next stocking so they can eat more crappie, for example.

Finally, I'd guess the Crappie eat each others' young, so it's a mutually beneficial arrangement.

Posted by Henry V Elite Member over 9 years ago

Scott Brockmeyer

Nice catch, never seen a white crappie

Posted by Scott Brockmeyer Expert Member over 9 years ago

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Fishing report - 0.6 lb. White Crappie caught by Dennis Huskins fishing in New Jersey on 05/10/11 Fishing report - White Crappie caught by Chris Dennis fishing on 05/08/11
0.6 lb. White Crappie caught by Dennis Huskins fishing in New Jersey on 05/10/11 White Crappie caught by Chris Dennis fishing on 05/08/11

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